10 Myths About Viagra

By ohtadmin | on July 26, 2006

BY JONATHAN LAZARE, M.D

1. If one Viagra is good, two are better. The maximum dose of Viagra is 100 mg. per day. Exceeding this dose may result in serious problems including cardiac and visual complications. A Viagra overdose can also lead to priapism, or an erection that will not go away without medical intervention. If a patient takes an overdose of Viagra, he should immediately seek medical attention. Ipecac, which induces vomiting, is helpful if the pills have been taken less than one hour before.

2. Viagra increases sexual desire in men. Viagra does not affect male sexual desire. Viagra only improves the ability to obtain and maintain an erection. Viagra causes dilation of the artery to the penis. The penis then fills with blood and this leads to an erection. Desire or libido, however, is due to other medical factors such as the testosterone level and the overall health of the patient. Psychological and relationship issues also affect the sex drive.

3. Viagra increases sexual desire in women. Viagra has no direct effect upon female sexual desire or the ability to have an orgasm. Viagra improves the arousal phase of the female sexual response. During the arousal phase, there is an increase in blood flow to the female sexual organs and the vagina becomes lubricated.

4. Viagra causes priapism. The risk of priapism from Viagra is low as long as reasonable precautions are taken. Again, priapism is a prolonged erection that will not go away without medical intervention. The patient is at increased risk for priapism if he consumes more than the maximum daily dose of Viagra. The risk of priapism is also increased if Viagra is combined with other medications for erectile dysfunction. Finally, Viagra is more likely to cause priapism if it is taken with recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana.

5. A person can become addicted to Viagra. Viagra does not lead to chemical addiction. The patient may develop a psychological dependency to Viagra and become convinced that he must have Viagra in order to have sex. There is no physical basis to this dependency.

6. Viagra causes blindness. There is a concern that Viagra may be associated with a disease called non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or NAION. This condition can lead to blindness. Compared to the millions of men on Viagra, only about 50 cases of NAION have been reported. In the worse case scenario, Viagra may rarely lead to NAION. Studies concerning this issue are in progress. So far, the data is inconclusive.

7. Viagra causes heart attacks. The risk of a heart attack with Viagra is low so long as reasonable precautions are exercised. Viagra should only be taken under the supervision of a doctor. Men who take Nitrites or Nitrates for a cardiac condition should never take Viagra. Viagra should not be used in men who have had a recent heart attack or arrhythmia. Patients with unstable angina, which is chest pain at rest, should not use Viagra. Finally, men who have recently undergone heart surgery should not take Viagra.

8. If Viagra does not work, Cialis or Levitra might work. All three pills belong to a class of medications called 5-phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors. Because they share a similar mechanism of action, the three pills work equally well and have similar side effects. If Viagra does not work, it is unlikely that the Cialis or Levitra will work.

9. It is safe to buy Viagra over the Internet. Viagra should not be purchased over the Internet. There is a strong temptation to buy Viagra over the Internet where it may be less expensive. Viagra, Levitra and Cialis are expensive when purchased at the pharmacy. The cost of the medications range from $12 to $20 per pill. Nevertheless, buying these medications over the Internet is dangerous because you cannot be sure what you are buying. The pills should be purchased at a reputable pharmacy and taken under the supervision of a physician.

10. Viagra can be combined with other medications for erectile dysfunction. Viagra should not be combined with other medications used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. The only possible exception to this rule is that Viagra may be combined with testosterone supplements in those patients with low testosterone levels. This combined therapy should only be taken under the direct supervision of a doctor.

Jonathan Lazare, M.D is a board-certified urologist practicing in Manhattan. He is an attending in urology at the New York Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center and at the Mount Sinai Medical Center. Lazare specializes in sexual dysfunction. He has published papers in several journals including the Journal of Urology and Urology.

Lazare’s articles concerning sexual dysfunction have appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines including the New York Beacon, Brooklyn Eagle, Filipino Reporter, Carribean News, Bronx Press Review, Riverdale Review, New York Resident, Brooklyn View, Mandate Magazine, El Diario, Hoy, Impacto Latin News, Boston Edge Web site, and Playboy.com. For more information, contact him at his office, 1112 Park Ave., New York, New York 10128, 212426-0400, or visit www.DRJLAZARE.com. Viagra should not be purchased over the Internet. There is a strong temptation to buy Viagra over the Internet where it may be less expensive. Viagra, Levitra and Cialis are expensive when purchased at the pharmacy. The cost of the medications range from $12 to $20 per pill. Nevertheless, buying these medications over the Internet is dangerous because you cannot be sure what you are buying. The pills should be purchased at a reputable pharmacy and taken under the supervision of a physician.

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