Anonymous group takes down Isis website, replaces it with Viagra ad along with message to calm down.
The site, apparently taken down by a group called Ghost Sec, is part of a new attempt by Isis to make their online propaganda work harder to trace.
Andrew Griffin @_andrew_griffin Thursday 26 November 2015 09:46 GMT.
The Independent Tech.
A group associated with Anonymous has hacked into an Isis supporting website, replacing it with a message to calm down alongside an advert for an online pharmacy.
Isis sites have been moving onto the dark web in an attempt not to be discovered. But a hacking group called Ghost Sec, which is related to Anonymous, took the site down and replaced it with a message telling readers that there was “Too Much ISIS”.
“Enhance your calm,” the full message read. “Too many people are into this ISIS-stuff. Please gaze upon this lovely ad so we can upgrade our infrastructure to give you ISIS content you all so desperately crave.”
Anonymous ‘Operation Isis’ accused of wrongly naming innocent people.
The ad — which linked to an online pharmacy where payments can be made in bitcoin — would allow people to click through to by online prescription drugs, including Prozac and Viagra.
Before the site was taken down, it was understood to be one of a number of sites that were sharing and copying Isis propaganda so that it could avoid detection and being shut down. Many such unofficial sites have been created on the dark web, according to security blogger Scot Terban, though a large number of them appear to be unofficial and largely disorganised attempts.
Anti-Isis demonstrations across Europe.
Anti-Isis demonstrations across Europe.
1/10 Anti-Isis protests in Ankara, Turkey.
A person holds a flag as police uses tear gas and water cannon in Ankara against demonstrators who protest against attacks launched by Islamic State insurgents targeting the Syrian city of Kobani and lack of action by the government.
2/10 Anti-Isis protests in Diyarbaki, Turkey.
Protesters clashing with riot police during a demonstration against Isis in Diyarbakir, southeast of Turkey.
3/10 Anti-Isis protests in Diyarbaki, Turkey.
Kurdish protesters in the southeastern city of Diyarbakir.
4/10 Anti-Isis protests in Diyarbaki, Turkey.
Kurdish protesters clash with Turkish riot policemen in the city of Diyarbakir.
5/10 Anti-Isis protests in Brussels, Belgium.
Riot police block Kurdish protesters as they gather in front of the entrance of the European Parliament in Brussels.
6/10 Anti-Isis protests in Berlin, Germany.
Demonstrators, including one holding a sign that reads: “Save the Kurds of Kobane from IS,” and many of them members of Berlin’s large Kurdish community, march to protest against the ongoing violence by militias of the Isis in Iraq and Syria in Berlin.
7/10 Anti-Isis protests in Hamburg, Germany.
Kurds protest against Isis militants advancing through the Syrian border city of Kobani, in Hamburg, Germany.
8/10 Anti-Isis protests in London, UK.
Kurdish protesters gather at Heathrow Airport as anti-Isis demonstrations take place across Europe.
9/10 Anti-Isis protests in Paris, France.
Kurds living in France demonstrate in Paris.
10/10 Anti-Isis protests in Marseille, France.
Kurdish people hold flag in Marseille during a protest against the threat of a “Syrian Kurdish population’s genocide” by Isis militants and to support the population of the Syrian Kurdish town of Ain al-Arab, known as Kobani.
According to some bloggers, Isis supporters have been looking to move their propaganda sites onto the dark web because they are less likely to be discovered and shut down. It is unclear how closely associated the site and the group are, with much of its online activity being done by people who are affiliated with Isis rather than directly associated with the group.
Isis supporters have been attempting to publish sites on the dark web — a part of the internet made up of pages that are not publicly accessible and often require users to be using tools that provide anonymity.
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